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SD yanks 'Don’t Jerk and Drive' campaign

A public safety campaign in South Dakota backfired when officials heard its "Don't Jerk and Drive" push and forced them to pull the ad. Officials admitted the double entendre was intentional, the Sioux Falls Argus-Leader reported in its story. Th...

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A public safety campaign in South Dakota backfired when officials heard its “Don’t Jerk and Drive” push and forced them to pull the ad.

Officials admitted the double entendre was intentional, the Sioux Falls Argus-Leader reported in its story.

The campaign was based on raising awareness of jerking the steering wheel on icy roads. But, "jerk" also has other sexual meanings.

Department of Public Safety Secretary Trevor Jones said in a statement that he pulled the ad. “This is an important safety message, and I don’t want this innuendo to distract from our goal to save lives on the road.”

In an Argus-Leader poll, 53 percent said they thought the campaign was appropriate.

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