Sponsored By
An organization or individual has paid for the creation of this work but did not approve or review it.

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Shoddy treatment gets spurge

LEAFY SPURGE: To the former executive director of the Fargo-Moorhead Humane Society, who pleaded guilty to a charge of animal mistreatment. Twenty-nine-year-old Gail Ann Widmer entered the plea in Cass County District Court. She was ordered by th...

LEAFY SPURGE: To the former executive director of the Fargo-Moorhead Humane Society, who pleaded guilty to a charge of animal mistreatment. Twenty-nine-year-old Gail Ann Widmer entered the plea in Cass County District Court. She was ordered by the court to pay $600 in fees and was placed on probation for one year. Authorities said Widmer, who headed the Fargo-Moorhead Humane Society from August 2003 to August 2004, had locked animals in the back bedroom of an apartment she rented in West Fargo. West Fargo Police officer Stacy Dawkins testified that the smell of urine and feces in the apartment was so strong that she could not enter without plugging her nose and breathing through her mouth. "I was standing on the balcony actually gagging, almost throwing up," testified Dawkins. Widmer's treatment of the cats and dogs in that apartment was anything but humane.

PRAIRIE ROSES: To Minnesota State University Moorhead associate biology professor Ellen Brisch, who has been named the Minnesota Professor of the Year. The honor is sponsored by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching and is administered by the Council for Advancement and Support of Education. The 45-year-old Brisch, who is noted for his innovative teaching methods, has taught at MSUM since 1999. Her colleagues say students respond well to Brisch's teaching methods and remember what they learned. Last year, Brisch was one of 17 college professors selected as "outstanding advisers" by the National Academic Advising Association. Also active on campus, Brisch recently served as chairwoman of a task force that revamped MSUM's core curriculum.

LEAFY SPURGE: To a 66-year-old man in Washington state, who doesn't appear to be too bright. Sheriff's deputies say he tried to loosen a stubborn lug nut on a Lincoln Continental by blasting a wheel with a 12-gauge shotgun, injuring himself badly in both legs. The sheriff's report said that, from about arm's length, the man fired the shotgun at the wheel and was "peppered" in both legs with buckshot and debris, with some injuries as high as his chin. He was taken to Tacoma General Hospital with injuries that were severe, but not

life-threatening.

PRAIRIE ROSES: To Steve Swiontek of Fargo, who received the North Dakota Chamber of Commerce Leadership Award during a recent North Dakota State University football game in Fargo. The award is one of the chamber's highest honors and was presented in recognition of the spirit of service and support Swiontek brings to the community of Fargo. Swiontek, chairman, president and chief executive officer of Gate City Bank in Fargo, has used his leadership abilities to build a strong business in North Dakota and a strong community.

ADVERTISEMENT

PRAIRIE ROSES: To Brian Hayer, president of Warner and Co. Insurance in Fargo, who was recently awarded the Charles Bailly Award, presented annually by the YMCA. The award recognizes an individual who is willing to take courageous steps on behalf of the greater good. Hayer has volunteered for many years at the YMCA in Fargo where he is past president of its board of directors and a board committee member. He has also served as chairman for both the Partner of Youth campaign and the 2000 capital campaign, raising $1.7 million for expansion of the downtown YMCA.

Forum editorials represent the opinion of Forum management and the newspaper's Editorial Board

Shoddy treatment gets spurge 20071119

What To Read Next
The Buffalo Bills safety who suffered a cardiac arrest on Monday Night Football in January is urging people to learn how to save lives the way his was saved.
Josh Sipes was watching an in-flight movie when he became aware the flight crew were asking for help assisting a woman who was experiencing a medical problem.
A Sanford doctor says moderate cold exposure could be the boost people need for their day.
Nonprofit hospitals are required to provide free or discounted care, also known as charity care; yet eligibility and application requirements vary across hospitals. Could you qualify? We found out.