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Speed monitors don't take pictures

No, it's not taking your photograph. But yes, that flashing light does mean you're driving too fast. Roadside speed monitors, currently seen at the Interstate 94 bridge project at I-29 in Fargo, have strobe lights that are triggered by vehicles t...

No, it's not taking your photograph. But yes, that flashing light does mean you're driving too fast.

Roadside speed monitors, currently seen at the Interstate 94 bridge project at I-29 in Fargo, have strobe lights that are triggered by vehicles traveling over a certain speed.

"The flashing light is nothing more than something that gets your attention," said David Sprynczynatyk, director of the North Dakota Department of Transportation.

"Trust me, it's not taking your picture," he said. "People have accused us of that, but it's not."

The monitors, referred to as "radar trailers" by NDDOT officials, also have a siren. However, it's rarely used because of its disrupting nature and limited effectiveness on passing cars, said Kevin Gorder, project engineer at the NDDOT district office in Fargo.

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Neither the strobe lights nor sirens are currently activated on the monitors at the Interstate 94 bridge replacement project in Fargo. Gorder said there isn't enough sunlight yet to support the monitor's solar-powered batteries.

Still, the speed reading alone is usually enough to slow drivers, he said. "From my standpoint, they're very effective," Gorder said. "I see a lot of brake lights come on as they get close to them."

Readers can reach Forum reporter Mike Nowatzki at (701) 241-5528

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