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Stenehjem: Repeat offender of N.D.'s do-not-call law to pay $25,000

BISMARCK - A telemarketer who has repeatedly violated North Dakota's do not call law will pay $25,000 in lieu of civil penalties to resolve the latest complaint, Attorney General Wayne Stenehjem said in a news release Friday.

Wayne Stenehjem

BISMARCK - A telemarketer who has repeatedly violated North Dakota's do not call law will pay $25,000 in lieu of civil penalties to resolve the latest complaint, Attorney General Wayne Stenehjem said in a news release Friday.

Community Welfare Services, Inc., a professional telemarketer located in Oakdale, Minnesota, was first accused of violating North Dakota's do not call law in 2006. That complaint was resolved with a formal settlement agreement in which Community Welfare Services agreed to comply with North Dakota law and paid $1,000 in lieu of civil penalties, the release said.

In June 2007, Community Welfare Services violated the agreement by calling a consumer registered on the North Dakota do-not-call list. That complaint was resolved by a $1,000 penalty.

Stenehjem's office received another complaint in September 2007 regarding another violation of the law, this time a solicitation made for the Committee for Missing Children, Inc. of Lawrenceville, Georgia. An investigation by the Attorney General revealed a large number of violations of the do-not-call law could be proven in connection with the campaign. To resolve the matter, Community Welfare Services agreed to pay $25,000 in lieu of civil penalties, attorney fees and costs, without admitting liability, according to the release.

"Telemarketers need to know that North Dakota's settlements cannot be treated simply as a 'cost of doing business.' We will continue to aggressively protect the privacy rights of North Dakota consumers," Stenehjem said. "In this case, $25,000 reflects the seriousness of the repeat violations."

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A separate settlement was reached with the Committee for Missing Children, who agreed to comply with North Dakota law and pay $1,000 in lieu of civil penalties.

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