Sponsored By
An organization or individual has paid for the creation of this work but did not approve or review it.

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Teachers not ready for time off proposal

Fargo teachers say this isn't the time for paid time off. Negotiators for the Fargo School District and Fargo Education Association, representing about 800 teachers, are trying to hammer out a 2003-05 contract. The current two-year contract is ex...

Fargo teachers say this isn't the time for paid time off.

Negotiators for the Fargo School District and Fargo Education Association, representing about 800 teachers, are trying to hammer out a 2003-05 contract. The current two-year contract is expiring.

Among the district's proposals: Combining teachers' current sick, emergency and personal leave into paid time off. Doing so would give teachers more flexibility when they need to miss work, according to the district.

"This would benefit teachers," said Jim Johnson, a Fargo School Board member and district negotiator.

But teacher negotiators said paid time off would be such a radical change they don't want to make it part of the new contract.

ADVERTISEMENT

"We're just not ready for this. We need to have a better idea of the impact it would have," said Lee Myxter, a Fargo teacher and Fargo Education Association negotiator.

Negotiators, meeting Tuesday, made little progress on the teachers' salaries issue.

The district is offering to raise salaries by about 6.8 percent over the next two years.

Teachers are asking for an increase of about 11 percent over two years. They received an increase of 11.9 percent when they negotiated their current contract in 2001.

Negotiations are scheduled to resume June 10.

Readers can reach Forum reporter Jonathan Knutson at (701) 241-5530

What To Read Next
Columnist Carol Bradley Bursack lists the various reason why some older adults may begin to shuffle as they age.
The Buffalo Bills safety who suffered a cardiac arrest on Monday Night Football in January is urging people to learn how to save lives the way his was saved.
Josh Sipes was watching an in-flight movie when he became aware the flight crew were asking for help assisting a woman who was experiencing a medical problem.
A Sanford doctor says moderate cold exposure could be the boost people need for their day.