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Training helps parents advocate

A program that provides parents of children with developmental disabilities, including autism, an opportunity to learn ways to advocate for policy changes is offering free training in North Dakota and Minnesota.

A program that provides parents of children with developmental disabilities, including autism, an opportunity to learn ways to advocate for policy changes is offering free training in North Dakota and Minnesota.

Partners in Policymaking, created by the Minnesota Governor's Council on Developmental Disabilities, will start its training in Minnesota in September, but those taking part must apply by July 24. There are spots for 40 people.

The North Dakota training starts in October. There are 25 spots and while applications are taken any time, a waiting list is maintained.

The Minnesota classes will be held at the Minneapolis Airport Marriott in Bloomington.

North Dakota classes will be held at the Expressway Inn & Suites in Fargo.

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For information on how to apply in Minnesota, go to www.mngts.org/partnersinpolicymaking or call Carol Schoeneck at Government Training Services, (800) 0569-6878, ext. 205, or (651) 222-7409, ext. 205.

For information about how to apply in North Dakota, call Joyce Smith of The Arc of Bismarck at (701) 258-7949. In-state callers can phone toll free at (888) 258-7949. Details about the program and applications can be found at www.thearcofbismarck.org/partners .

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