Sponsored By
An organization or individual has paid for the creation of this work but did not approve or review it.

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

W. Fargo rejects staff hires

West Fargo won't add staff in 2004 to keep property taxes down, but some city employees worry they may be overworked. The City Commission met Thursday to discuss the preliminary budget, which calls for a slight tax increase and a $1 garbage rate ...

West Fargo won't add staff in 2004 to keep property taxes down, but some city employees worry they may be overworked.

The City Commission met Thursday to discuss the preliminary budget, which calls for a slight tax increase and a $1 garbage rate hike.

City Auditor Jim Brownlee said West Fargo can get by for another year without additional staff, but next year new hires will likely be included in the budget.

The proposed budget calls for a 4-mill increase in West Fargo's tax levy, or an $18 increase on a $100,000 home.

Last year, property taxes were increased by $34 for a $100,000 home.

ADVERTISEMENT

Garbage rates will be increased for the first time since 1991. Charging residents $1 extra on each bill will generate about $60,000 a year, Brownlee said.

The Public Works department will begin studying utility rates this winter to determine if other increases are needed.

Additional money from rate increases could pay for more employees, Brownlee said.

But Planning Director Larry Weil said increased demand from a growing community is spreading some departments too thin.

"I think we're all just managing. It's a strain on the existing staff," Weil said. "We feel that we've got the demand now for additional staff, as do other departments."

The proposed budget totals nearly $16.6 million, up from 2003's budget of $16.4 million.

A public hearing for the West Fargo budget is planned for the commission's Sept. 29 meeting. The deadline for the budget's final approval is Oct. 1.

Readers can reach Forum reporter Amy Dalrymple at (701) 241-5590

What To Read Next
The Buffalo Bills safety who suffered a cardiac arrest on Monday Night Football in January is urging people to learn how to save lives the way his was saved.
Josh Sipes was watching an in-flight movie when he became aware the flight crew were asking for help assisting a woman who was experiencing a medical problem.
A Sanford doctor says moderate cold exposure could be the boost people need for their day.
Nonprofit hospitals are required to provide free or discounted care, also known as charity care; yet eligibility and application requirements vary across hospitals. Could you qualify? We found out.