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Weather Talk: 2013 not extremely wet year for immediate metro area

Fargo-Moorhead official precipitation data is taken from Hector International Airport during the warm season and from our cooperative observer in north Moorhead during the cold season.

Fargo-Moorhead official precipitation data is taken from Hector International Airport during the warm season and from our cooperative observer in north Moorhead during the cold season.

Using the data from those two sites, 32.10 inches of liquid precipitation was measured last year. That is about 10 inches above average and ranked 2013 as the fourth-wettest year on record. Yet, almost all of that excessive precipitation occurred from just two events. On May 29 and 30, the airport recorded 4.62 inches of rain. Then on June 25 and 26, the airport recorded 3.96 inches of rain.

Although both events did hit other parts of the metro, they were both very localized. In fact, many parts of the metro recorded less than one-half of those totals from each event. Meaning, although the official stats made 2013 appear to be an extremely wet year, most of the immediate area was just slightly above average for the year, with Jamestown and Grand Forks finishing the year drier than average.

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or write to WDAY Stormtracker, WDAY-TV, Box 2466, Fargo, ND 58108

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