Sponsored By
An organization or individual has paid for the creation of this work but did not approve or review it.

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Weather Talk: Nature tends to take periodic droughts in stride

Along the Red River, between the Fargo water plant and Lindenwood Park, there is a stand of willow shrubbery that has been there as long as I can remember. During most of the past 25 years, these willows have grown to 3-5 feet high when not being...

3526228+072017.N.FF_.WeatherTalk.jpg
We are part of The Trust Project.

Along the Red River, between the Fargo water plant and Lindenwood Park, there is a stand of willow shrubbery that has been there as long as I can remember. During most of the past 25 years, these willows have grown to 3-5 feet high when not being completely flooded as they grow right on the riverbank. Last year and this year, the absence of summer flooding apparently provided an opportunity for these shrubs to get healthy because they have grown to well over 12 feet high. They managed to survive repeated floods, but are now flourishing in this summer's drought. It just goes to show that drought is just a normal part of weather and some things do well in drought. In fact, many ecosystems need periodic drought to remain healthy. Even wetlands need an occasional drought to freshen up a bit. Agriculture is not served by drought in any way. Our suburban lawns are not served by drought. But nature just takes it in stride.

What To Read Next
A Sanford doctor says moderate cold exposure could be the boost people need for their day.
Nonprofit hospitals are required to provide free or discounted care, also known as charity care; yet eligibility and application requirements vary across hospitals. Could you qualify? We found out.
Columnist Carol Bradley Bursack explains the differences between Alzheimer's, dementia and other common forms of dementia.
While the United States government gave help to businesses and people, a lack of assistance has left some Chinese citizens angry and destitute.