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Weather Talk: Today is last day of fall on climatological calendar

Today not only marks the last day of the month but also the last day of autumn from a climatological perspective - meaning Saturday will be the beginning of climatological winter.

Today not only marks the last day of the month but also the last day of autumn from a climatological perspective - meaning Saturday will be the beginning of climatological winter.

Any forecast you may hear for winter is always referencing the three coldest months of the year: December, January and February. Granted, our winter goes well beyond those three months, but these remain the core months of the winter season.

The average temperature for the next three months in Fargo-Moorhead is 12.6 degrees. Four out of the past five winters finished with an average temperature below that mark. The exception, of course, was last year when we recorded the warmest winter on record.

Although our seasonal average snowfall is 50.1 inches, the three principal months of winter have an average snowfall of 29.4 inches and an average liquid equivalency (rain and melted snow) of 2.14 inches.

Averages are just averages, and so the weather over the next 90 days will likely be highly variable.

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or write to WDAY Stormtracker, WDAY-TV, Box 2466, Fargo, ND 58108 Read the blog at http://stormtrack.areavoices.com/ .

Related Topics: WEATHERWEATHERTALK
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