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Weather Talk: Weeks of news coverage to go before flood's over

Flood frustration is high. Everyone is tired of it. The possibility of a third consecutive big spring flood became very real when heavy rainfall saturated the soils last fall, and local news media have been offering flood news ever since. The she...

Flood frustration is high. Everyone is tired of it. The possibility of a third consecutive big spring flood became very real when heavy rainfall saturated the soils last fall, and local news media have been offering flood news ever since. The sheer volume of flood news has added greatly to flood fear and agitation.

All local news media, in competing for your attention, will continue to look for different angles, different ways to illuminate the flood situation, always with the goal of making things more clear. This happens because a newspaper with flood news is more likely to be purchased than one without flood news. A television or radio newscast with flood news is more likely to be watched or listened to than one without. Sales and ratings prove it.

And with the weather still cold, we will all have to wait through several more weeks of flood coverage before we all find out how the 2011 flood will turn out.

Have a weather question you'd like answered? E-mail weather@wday.com ,

or write to WDAY Stormtracker, WDAY-TV, Box 2466, Fargo, ND 58108

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