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Webinars set on services to help older adults, those with physical disabilities live at home in North Dakota

The North Dakota Department of Human Services will host webinars in December on existing in-home and community-based programs.

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iStock / Special to The Forum

BISMARCK — The North Dakota Department of Human Services is hosting virtual events to connect older adults and adults with physical disabilities to services that can help them live at home.

Two noontime webinars in December will familiarize participants with existing in-home and community-based programs and services and outline who qualifies for them.

The Thursday, Dec. 9, webinar from 12 to 12:30 p.m. CST spotlights the state’s Aging and Disability Resource Link.

A link to join the webinar online can be found at www.nd.gov/dhs/info/pubs/docs/aging/flyer-hcbs-spotlight-webinar-adrl.pdf, or participants can contact the ADRL at 855-462-5465, 711 TTY.

On Thursday, Dec. 16, from 12 to 12:30 p.m. CST, department team members will give a brief overview of in-home and community-based programs funded by the state and federal government and the programs' requirements.

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Topics include Medicaid State Plan personal services, Medicaid waiver for Home and Community-Based Services, the Service Payments for the Elderly and Disabled (SPED) program, and the Expanded Service Payments for the Elderly and Disabled (Ex-SPED) program.

Related Topics: WELLNESSNEWSMD
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