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Week predicted to kick off with 55- to 60-below-zero wind chills

FARGO - Meteorologists predict several days of harsh winter weather for the Fargo-Moorhead area after Friday's brief relief that saw temperatures rise into the 20s.

FARGO - Meteorologists predict several days of harsh winter weather for the Fargo-Moorhead area after Friday's brief relief that saw temperatures rise into the 20s.

"This is a short-lived, one-day thing," National Weather Service meteorology technician Bill Barrett said of Friday's warmth.

Barrett said the F-M area will see "life-threatening cold" for early next week.

Sunday gets the bone-chilling temperatures off to a start with a high of 17 below and a low of 24 below. It is expected to keep getting colder into Monday, he said.

"The actual air temp should get down to 25 or 30 below for the low," Barrett said of Monday's forecast. "With 15- to 20-mile-an-hour winds, we're looking at possibly 55- to 60-below wind chills, which haven't been experienced here for quite some time."

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He said the early onset and lengthy duration of subzero temperatures in Fargo-Moorhead is an unusual weather pattern.

"The average or the normal low is only about zero for this time of the year," Barrett said. "We're looking at being about 25 to 30 degrees below that."

After a rough start to the week, forcasted temperatures will rise to a high of 8 degrees with a low of 13 below Wednesday, and a high of 13 degrees with a low of 8 below Thursday.

Barrett is optimistic about the short-term forecast.

"Improvement's on the way," he said. "By this time next week, we could very well be sitting in more reasonable temperatures, which will feel even warmer because we would've gotten used to these ridiculously cold temperatures and the wind, too."

Related Topics: WEATHER
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