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Weekend watch: 'The Marriage of Figaro'

Friday With "The Marriage of Figaro," Mozart gives us a comedic opera that, unlike tragic takes of the genre, does away with the mandatory heartbreak and bloodshed. But that doesn't mean that if a young couple wants to tie the knot, they'll enjoy...

Jamie Hagen plays The Countess to Elliott Schwab's Figaro

Friday

With "The Marriage of Figaro," Mozart gives us a comedic opera that, unlike tragic takes of the genre, does away with the mandatory heartbreak and bloodshed.

But that doesn't mean that if a young couple wants to tie the knot, they'll enjoy a smooth trip to the altar. Indeed, Figaro and his beloved Susanna, servants in the Spanish Count Almaviva's court, stumble into a jumble of complications.

As if planning a wedding wasn't stressful enough, the philandering count keeps peppering Susanna with indecent proposals. Figaro has failed to pay a debt, and his creditor insists he marry her. Also encroaching on wedding prep time is the couple's plot to shame the count into repenting for his advances.

The North Dakota State University Opera Theatre navigates the ensuing comic twists in a Friday production, which starts at 7:30 p.m. in NDSU's Festival Concert Hall. Tickets are $15 for adults, $12 for seniors and $5 for students, (701) 231-9442

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