Do you feel overwhelmed and tired when you think about your goals?

Maybe you’re working from home these days, and you have an extra hour or two each day that you normally wouldn’t have.

But, despite this, you’re stuck.

You feel bogged down because your problems are piling up. Instead of making a decision to change something, you either talk yourself out of it, or you allow someone else to talk you out of it.

Making good decisions faster will increase your output. You can get a lot more done if you take control of pushing past your fears.

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A working mother we’ll call Gina has four generations of family members living with her. “My house was so over-crowded,” she declares, “but a few months ago, I made a bold decision that really helped.

“I sat down with my husband and explained I wanted to use some savings to create a large family room. We’d find the room to do it by using our attached double-car garage. We got busy and the result is fantastic.”

One good decision can reduce your stress enormously. The result you want is this: You want a decision to improve your lifestyle in the future.

Here are several ideas for trying something new:

  • Encourage your family members to pool their resources. For example, if your elderly parents need their house painted, ask younger family members to chip in time and money. Make the work seem fun, affordable, and doable.
  • Figure out a simple plan to eat healthier. For example, cook larger batches and freeze food for later. Or, use clear zipper bags to create a healthy “salad bar” in your refrigerator.
  • Get an exercise plan that works. For example, ride your exercise bike in front of the TV every night. Or, ask your spouse to walk with you for 45 minutes three afternoons per week.
  • Finish your college degree online. Take a couple of classes and reserve weekends for extra study time. Use time that you’re at home during the pandemic to reach goals you’ll be proud of.

If you make up your mind to change something in your life, you’ll be surprised how much easier your daily chores will get done.

When major problems get whittled down to size, you’ll feel your personal energy soaring. Your successful decisions will boost your self-esteem, too.

“I used to take a vote from several members of my family before I bought paint or tile for my house,” says a music teacher we’ll call Katrina. “I was fearful of being judged or making a mistake, so it was taking me years to remodel a house I’d bought from my cousin. However, last fall I decided to make more decisions on my own. I was amazed at how powerful I felt.”

Katrina got her three-bedroom, two-bath home in great shape within six months. And, she says, the best part was that she did not consult with anyone. She made all design choices by herself.

“I once interviewed the mother of eight children,” says a journalist we’ll refer to as Alana. “I wanted to know how she kept her house so nice, took care of all those kids, and worked part-time as a real estate agent.”

This super-mom told Alana that making one great decision after another, as fast as you can, is the answer. She shared her belief that most people dribble away their time by procrastinating. They bog down, feel lost, and quit pushing.

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Judi Light Hopson is author of the stress management book, “Cooling Stress Tips.” She is also executive director of USA Wellness Cafe at www.usawellnesscafe.org.

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