Letter: We need to learn how to disagree

I agree with another reader's opinion on the need for courage to follow our principles, and thank him for the insights he offered. I do disagree with the assessment that support for Trump represents a coarsening of our morals. I contend it highli...

I agree with another reader's opinion on the need for courage to follow our principles, and thank him for the insights he offered. I do disagree with the assessment that support for Trump represents a coarsening of our morals. I contend it highlights the defense of a higher moral.

Republican supporters are not blindly genuflecting before an unprincipled man-child. They are freely following their conscience to choose the blunt weapon needed to confront ideas they believe are even more dangerous than his jerkiness and pride.

Why is that distinction important? Because the fight is for a principle that underlies all peaceful communities: protecting the God-given value of every human. Our communities rot when we fail to embody this.

Unfortunately, simply standing our ground as we fight over ways to achieve it, or seeking to win by denying the validity of another's conscience results in political trench warfare.

Ironically, humility allows us to break this deadlock by compelling us to fight better. We can fight for opportunities to love our enemies as well as our neighbors, not just to defend our principles. It opens up the spirit of compromise that Edmund Burke said is the foundation for "every human benefit and enjoyment, every virtue, and every prudent act."

Humility is not a virtue I expect from the world; frankly, it takes an act of God in a person's soul. At the very least, I'm confident I'm not adding poison to the well by encouraging it in my family and in my community.

Tweten lives in Jamestown, N.D.