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Ben Hanna letter: Now the hard part begins for President Bush

After Wednesday's apparent toppling of the Iraqi government, the United States is entering the most important part of the war: peace settlement and the creation of a new government.

After Wednesday's apparent toppling of the Iraqi government, the United States is entering the most important part of the war: peace settlement and the creation of a new government.

This war is relatively unprecedented in American history. Previous wars have been in creation or defense, like the Revolutionary, 1812 and Civil War. Others were wars of expansion, as in the Mexican-American and Spanish-American wars. The world wars were in support of our allies, and created no lasting peace, as communist and capitalist forces faced off in the third world exposition of the Cold War. The last war on Iraq was to restore the sovereignty of Kuwait.

This is a new kind of war. For the first time the United States has fought an offensive war of liberation. The United States must now bring democracy successfully to Iraq. The success of this will depend on negotiations with Great Britain and the United Nations, and the support of the Iraqi people.

If President Bush can pull this off, he will go down in history as a liberator, and America will once again be a friend of the oppressed. If the new government fails, or if Iraq is partitioned out to the United States and her allies, global anti-Americanism will get worse. America will be seen as a global bully, taking down at will regimes that disapprove of our way of life for neo-colonization.

This is the true test for the competency and vision of President Bush.

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Ben Hanna

Moorhead

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