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Columns

Columnist Jim Shaw responds to reports North Dakota Attorney General Drew Wrigley sent a message to Sen. Cramer outlining a "last-ditch effort" to reverse the 2020 election.
Columnist Joan Brickner responds to recent outrage over Black actors filling traditionally white roles.
Columnist Scott Hennen writes that North Dakota Gov. Burgum likens the state's burgeoning CO2 industry to the creation of the Bakken in western North Dakota.
Columnist Ross Nelson writes, "Diversity can lead to outright bigotry. The Minneapolis school system has inked a contract with the Minneapolis Federation of Teachers to lay off white teachers before Black teachers with less seniority. In other words, not only is the teachers' union worthless in protecting its members, it also agrees that punishment for the racist sins of the fathers six generations removed should be visited on their descendants' heads today."

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The last thing we need is a bunch of opportunistic politicians jumping into the debate over carbon pipelines not to protect their constituents but to exact revenge on their political enemies.
Columnist Bette Grande responds to President Biden calling right-wing Republicans and MAGA extremists a threat to “our democracy.”
Columnist Steve Grineski writes about the changing role and importance of school board members.
A memo says the race between incumbent Republican and independent "competitive" was sparked by the overturning of Roe v. Wade.
Ben Hanson, a candidate for the Cass County Commission, and Sen. Kevin Cramer join this episode of Plain Talk.
Columnist Lloyd Omdahl encourages lawmakers to invest Legacy Fund dollars on education.

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The Scandia Lutheran Church in Averill, Minnesota, held its last worship service on July 17. It sold off everything that was accumulated in 123 years of service, from the altar to the communion service set to even the metal coat racks that hung in the vestibule.
It's time for state officials to get serious about this. There are too many red flags, too many convenient connections between family, political allies, and business partners, for us to believe that this deal was above board.
"Growing up in upper Midwest agriculture taught me the certainty of two things: consistently inconsistent weather and regular disputes between the Farm Bureau and Farmers Union, the area's two largest farm organizations."

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