ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Grande: Common sense, Part II

Grande writes, "The deterioration of our country traces its roots to Roe v. Wade in 1973 when we chose self-interest and convenience over the life."

Bette Grande online photo
Bette Grande
We are part of The Trust Project.

I received strong and affirming responses to my last column . Thank you to each of you who took the time to reach out. Reassurance is good and welcomed, more so when the challenges we face are so daunting. It may be discouraging at times but there are many people who feel the same way as you do about what the future holds for our children and grandchildren, take strength in that. You are not alone.

But these times we are living in – to those with eyes to see and ears to ear – require a little bit more than comfort in numbers, it is time to take a stand.

"Common Sense," by Thomas Paine, played a vital role in our fight for independence from England. The term and idea of "common sense" was very likely borrowed from Thomas Reid, a Scottish philosopher and founder of the Scottish School of Common Sense around that time. Common sense may be hard to define, but we know it, we feel it. We know that much of what we see now is wrong. What we see is the end of western civilization, and that is intentional, even welcomed. We can accept it, or we can fight.

Do not look for answers from politicians, reclaiming our culture will not come from the next election. Andrew Breitbart said, “politics is downstream from culture.” He was right. That means that if we want to reverse the course we are on, it starts with us, politicians will follow. They are not our “leaders,” they are our representatives. We are the leaders - if we chose to act.

We have to stand up, we have to speak out – especially when it is uncomfortable. If we do not set aside our comfort and speak out, our grandchildren will not know freedom and liberty, after all we barely do ourselves.

ADVERTISEMENT

Ronald Reagan once said, “Freedom is a fragile thing and it's never more than one generation away from extinction. It is not ours by way of inheritance; it must be fought for and defended constantly by each generation, for it comes only once to a people. And those in world history who have known freedom and then lost it have never known it again.”

In that same speech Reagan shared a quote from 1748: “The deterioration of every government begins with the decay of the principle upon which it was founded.” The deterioration of our country traces its roots to Roe v. Wade in 1973 when we chose self-interest and convenience over the life. When (actual) science debunked the “cluster of cells” talking point by showing the humanity of the unborn child many doubled down on their support for abortion, extending this right to the point of birth and beyond. If Roe is overruled, it is a start.

Reagan also quoted Disraeli saying, "Man is not a creature of circumstances. Circumstances are the creatures of men."

If we do not like our circumstances, it is up to us to change them.

Grande represented the 41st District in the N.D. Legislature from 1996 to 2014. She is CEO of the Roughrider Policy Center, an "innovation over regulation" think tank. She is a wife, mom, grandma, lover of life and Jesus. Opinions are solely her own.

This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of The Forum's editorial board nor Forum ownership.

READ MORE COLUMNS FROM BETTE GRANDE
Grande discusses bills in the North Dakota Legislature aimed at food security.

Opinion by Bette Grande
Grande represented the 41st District in the N.D. Legislature from 1996 to 2014. She is CEO of the Roughrider Policy Center, an "innovation over regulation" think tank. She is a wife, mom, grandma, lover of life and Jesus. Opinions are solely her own.
What To Read Next
Ferragut writes, "Years of research data proves that the adults in the student's home are more important to student success than teacher quality or class curriculum."
The reason many so-called Christians need to believe in the myth of a Christian founding is that they need it to justify a collection of deviant beliefs now found acceptable under the umbrella of Christian Nationalism.
Bills in the ND Legislature are aimed at banning books at local libraries, telling cities how they must hold elections, telling universities what they can’t teach, and telling school districts to teach fetal development.
Brickner writes, "Some call this the “politics of distraction.” We must not drag attention away from real issues to sideshows.