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Grande: The high costs of a green economy

Grande writes, "The promise of cost savings, like the predictions of climate disaster and the perpetual 10 years to save the planet, was just another lie."

Bette Grande online photo
Bette Grande
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What are you going to buy with the money you’re saving on your utility bills? Haven’t decided? Neither have I. The fact is that after years of being told that a transition to “cheaper” renewable energy would lower our utility bills, the exact opposite has happened. I am sure you have noticed. The promise of cost savings, like the predictions of climate disaster and the perpetual 10 years to save the planet, was just another lie.

There have been several letters to this paper recently concerning the looming climate catastrophe, think of these letters as booster shots to ensure the scare mongering doesn’t wear off. One of these letters even touched on what all the climate craziness over the past 50 years is all about, overpopulation. I appreciate the honesty.

As the early impacts of the transition to Net-Zero are being felt, here and across the world, food and energy inflation, issues with our electric grid, and bureaucratic policies tying the hands of farmers and ranchers, some are pushing back. Farmers in the Netherlands, Poland, Italy, and other countries have taken to the streets. In the U.S., well, at least some are starting to ask questions. Hey, it’s a start.

Last month Public Service Commissioner Julie Fedorchak and President of the North Dakota Petroleum Council Ron Ness each testified before the Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources, the testimonies can be found here . The title to the hearing was “Pathways to Lowering Energy Prices,” I kid you not. Apparently, some folks in Washington can’t quite put a finger on the causes of high energy prices. They could start by looking in the mirror.

In his testimony Ness laid out a logical, fact-based analysis of the impact that federal policies and the ESG agendas of woke banks and Wall Street firms has on domestic energy production. Oil companies cannot invest capital they do not have while facing an uncertain regulatory future.

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Fedorchak, a supporter of an "all of the above" energy policy, clearly addressed the impacts of an overly aggressive and forced transition to renewables. She testified, “Our electric rates are also rising, transmission costs in North Dakota have increased 388 percent since 2003.” Saying further “Our utilities have aggressively pursued green energy, assuring customers that it will save them money, and yet their bills are rising. So, my first plea to you is this: we need to be honest with American citizens. Transitioning our grid to 100% renewable energy may be achievable and, for many, desirable, but it is not going to lower costs for anyone, especially in the next 25 years.”

Fedorchak also addressed reliability issues for our electric grids and other factors caused by pedal to the metal transition timeline coming from Washington.

Are policy makers in D.C. really interested in pathways to lowering energy prices? Don’t hold your breath (though that would reduce CO2). Sadly, the wallets, health, and safety of Americans will take a back seat to the goal of controlling our lives.

Grande represented the 41st District in the N.D. Legislature from 1996 to 2014. She is CEO of the Roughrider Policy Center, an "innovation over regulation" think tank. She is a wife, mom, grandma, lover of life and Jesus. Opinions are solely her own.

This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of The Forum's editorial board nor Forum ownership.

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Opinion by Bette Grande
Grande represented the 41st District in the N.D. Legislature from 1996 to 2014. She is CEO of the Roughrider Policy Center, an "innovation over regulation" think tank. She is a wife, mom, grandma, lover of life and Jesus. Opinions are solely her own.
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