ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Plain Talk: Supreme Court decision may bolster North Dakota's carbon capture projects says industry leader

This ruling "increases the odds that you're going to see carbon capture on some of our projects," says Jason Bohrer, president of the North Dakota Lignite Energy Council.

Keyframe - Tundra.jpg
Milton R. Young Station, a coal-fired power plant in Oliver County, North Dakota, which is also home of the Project Tundra carbon capture project.
File photo
We are part of The Trust Project.

MINOT, N.D. — America's industry, from power production to agriculture to manufacturing, needs "to be governed by policymakers not lawsuits."

That's what Jason Bohrer, president of the North Dakota Lignite Energy Council, said on this episode of Plain Talk. He sees the recent Supreme Court decision in North Dakota v. EPA as a boon not just for his industry, but for American democracy in that it will require Congress and other legislative bodies to actually make a decision on what it wants emissions policy to be, instead of punting the question to regulators and judges.

MORE PLAIN TALK
Click here to subscribe to the Plain Talk Podcast!
Let's not forget who it was that thought it a good idea for the school board to open this front in the culture war. Serving on a school board is not a license to indulge in personal political vendettas.
The home of Charles Tuttle, who helped organize signature-gathering efforts for the ballot measure, was search by Bureau of Criminal Investigation personnel.
If elected, Mund would have to choose a party to work with. Who would she choose? Maybe she'll refuse to answer, just as she's refused to answer who she voted for in 2020.

That's a more transparent process, he argues. A more predictable one. That, in the end, will serve America better.

And while some are arguing that the Supreme Court's finding that the EPA didn't have authority from Congress to regulate emissions in the way it was will endanger the environment, Bohrer sees it as helping.

He argues that projects such as carbon capture, of which there are many here in North Dakota, will be more viable now that they don't have to match pace with a timeline from the EPA that seemed calculated, on a political basis, to be "impossible to meet," according to Bohrer.

ADVERTISEMENT

This ruling "increases the odds that you're going to see carbon capture on some of our projects," he claims, and that seems likely.

Which is good news for North Dakota.

Want to be notified when new episodes of Plain Talk drop? Subscribe, for free, on the podcast platform of your choice .

Opinion by Rob Port
Rob Port is a news reporter, columnist, and podcast host for the Forum News Service. He has an extensive background in investigations and public records. He has covered political events in North Dakota and the upper Midwest for two decades. Reach him at rport@forumcomm.com. Click here to subscribe to his Plain Talk podcast.
What to read next
Some people claim the devil himself visited the tiny town of Villisca, Iowa, that summer night in 1912, when 8 people were killed by an ax murderer. Others say he already lived among them. After more than a century of idle gossip and speculation, some amateur sleuths might have just figured it out.
Breaking News
In memo, Tracie Newman says she doesn't want controversy to divert board resources away from preparing for school year
Move comes after Gov. Burgum says he'll push for law ensuring students, government bodies be given 'opportunity' to say pledge
Sure it's silly for Republicans to be this riled up over the Pledge of Allegiance. But they're apparently talking vengeance. Sometimes it's best to play the political game.