ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Dan Jacobson letter: Nothing offensive in use of Sioux logo

I wandered my way through the University of North Dakota Web site a couple days ago. The only place where I saw the use of the Sioux logo was in the athletics section.

I wandered my way through the University of North Dakota Web site a couple days ago. The only place where I saw the use of the Sioux logo was in the athletics section.

The current logo does not appear to me to be depicting the Sioux as a savage or otherwise negative people. In fact, to me it conjures up a chiseled, focused and proud impression of an American Indian individual. In my estimation, it doesn't appear it would be that difficult to leave the logo as is and instead just drop or modify the "Fighting" Sioux nickname. Why not call the athletic teams the "Resilient" Sioux, or the "Strong" Sioux, or maybe just the "Sioux."

I have seen many casino commercials in the past that to me should draw the ire of the Sioux descendants much more than the use of the Sioux logo at UND. I can only assume these commercials have been approved by the affiliated Indian tribes, which include the Sioux.

Because of this I don't understand what the determining factor is for those folks who are against the use of the Sioux logo and nickname. Why is it OK to give a commercialized impression that your tribe's history is at least partially based on gambling but not OK to show a proud Sioux American Indian on an athletic jersey or arena?

I have to admit that if UND wanted to depict my ancestors (Vikings) on their jerseys and other related locations and if they used such a positive depiction as is currently used as the "Sioux" at UND, I think I would be very proud to affiliate myself to that school.

ADVERTISEMENT

I also have to admit, however, that I would then appreciate being called the "Proud" Vikings or the "Resilient" Vikings or maybe even the "Strong" Vikings, but not necessarily the "Fighting" Vikings.

Anyway, for what it's worth, I have to believe that there is no ill will or negative intent behind the current use of the Sioux nickname or logo.

Dan Jacobson

Fargo

What To Read Next
A couple of bills introduced quietly would help feed students in public schools
Mikkel Pates set the standard for agricultural journalism during his 44-year career in the region, working for Agweek, The Forum and the Worthington Globe.
The administration at Theodore Roosevelt National Park is bent on getting rid of the horses, which means getting rid of vital living history and a major draw to the park.
Fargo city commission hand-wringing over northside Red River crossing is short-sighted