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Dr. Bob Lauf, Mayville, N.D., Letter: Risher is highly qualified for the PSC

I've known Steve Risher for several years, and am giving my public support to him for Public Service commissioner. He is the most electable candidate for several reasons: He has political experience, yet a clean voting record that won't be critic...

I've known Steve Risher for several years, and am giving my public support to him for Public Service commissioner.

He is the most electable candidate for several reasons: He has political experience, yet a clean voting record that won't be criticized. He has 25 years of financial experience, crucial to North Dakota's bottom line. He is a servant of the people, as his 20 years of work on charitable boards proves. He has the resources, organization and energy required to run an effective campaign, and is already actively working for change.

He's got a plan to advocate fair rates and practices for all North Dakotans, to actively work with developing alternate energy resources, and to ensure that North Dakota's financial interests are protected. Besides that, he's a great guy. He knows how to get the job done.

While serving as Hospice president, he helped bring Hospice to a state of financial stability, moving from a small building to a large, beautiful building, as well as putting in place measures to ensure future success. That's what we need for North Dakota: someone who knows how to inject enthusiasm and energy into the state.

I support Risher for Public Service commissioner. He believes in a new horizon, and so do I.

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