ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Eric Benson letter: Cute CableOne ads less than truthful

In response to the article Feb. 11 about CableOne raising its rates: This does not surprise me in the least. Does anyone remember the cute CableOne commercials last year with the girls in hardhats singing and dancing about how CableOne was freezi...

In response to the article Feb. 11 about CableOne raising its rates:

This does not surprise me in the least. Does anyone remember the cute CableOne commercials last year with the girls in hardhats singing and dancing about how CableOne was freezing its rates? I was not fooled; if I've learned anything in my adult life it's that there are three things you can count on, death, taxes, and higher cable rates.

And the reasons this time are ludicrous! "We felt it was a good thing to do based on the current economic conditions, the crisis and war in Iraq, and we wanted to let people know we care enough to observe those types of conditions." So they are actually blaming the increase on the war in Iraq? Give me a break! It's easier to believe when they say it's because the providers raise their product fees. You would think that because of bad economic conditions and wars and crises that they would help out their customers by lowering prices.

I currently depend on CableOne for cable TV and Internet service, their customer service is fairly good, and it's the best choice for me. Cable service will always be a luxury. I can afford it and I pay for it. But don't tell me you're raising prices because of the war in Iraq -- that's insulting. I will always be against rate increases and will continue to write letters to their home office and call their customer service lines so they are aware that they have customers that care about good, fairly priced service.

As for what they are doing right, I hope they keep this sports channel owned by the Twins as an a la carte choice. It would be completely unfair to make the average viewer pay for that channel unless they want it.

ADVERTISEMENT

Eric Benson

Fargo

What To Read Next
The administration at Theodore Roosevelt National Park is bent on getting rid of the horses, which means getting rid of vital living history and a major draw to the park.
Fargo city commission hand-wringing over northside Red River crossing is short-sighted
The Minnesota State system request for $350 million in additional funding would freeze tuition and train more desperately needed workers.
Part of resistance to bridge connecting downtown to Red River lies with Fargo's perception