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Fargo 20/20 will shift cost burden to city

When I first read the 20/20 measure, it seemed like it might be a reasonable idea. As a supporter of renewable energy, I thought that, too, until I learned more about what's currently being done and thinking through the possible adverse impact of...

When I first read the 20/20 measure, it seemed like it might be a reasonable idea. As a supporter of renewable energy, I thought that, too, until I learned more about what's currently being done and thinking through the possible adverse impact of this mandate on the city of Fargo.

It concerns me that the costs to implement this measure could be tremendous and Fargo citizens will have to pay for it. It justdoesn't seem right to have this cost burden on one city, instead of more widespread. Potentially, this could make Fargo less attractive to businesses and even residential housing.

Also, local energy companies already have renewable options that allow customers to decide what they are willing to pay for.

Make no mistake about it - if this measure passes, Fargo will foot the bill.

I don't think that's the right direction for us. That's why I'm voting no on Nov. 7.

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I wrote an op-ed that appeared in the Oct. 3 in The Forum in praise of the work and commitment that North Dakota ag commissioner Roger Johnson has made to the farmers, ranchers and citizens of North Dakota. I did this as a person in support of Johnson, not in my role as the chairman of the Dakota Resource Council, which is a nonpartisan organization and does not endorse candidates.

Unfortunately, a mean-spirited op-ed that was very spiteful of my opinion, written by Farm Bureau Political Action Committee chairman Eric Aasmundstad, appeared in the Oct. 8 Forum. In his overzealous support of the candidate of his choice, Aasmundstad has not only been factually inaccurate in describing the mission and purpose of the DRC but also has insulted and minimized most of North Dakota's farmers in the process.

I became a member of DRC in part because it stood for the fair markets and common sense approach to agriculture that would benefit rural communities such as the one I come from. DRC is an alliance of citizens committed to North Dakota's families and communities by safeguarding our economy, air, water and land through local organizing.

I forgive Aasmundstad for his personal attack on me, even though he does not know me, but what I can't forgive him for is using his distorted critique of the DRC to falsely attack Johnson, who by the way, is not a DRC member.

Why, with the stroke of a pen, would the chairman of a farm organization want to destroy any relationship that he has with the state ag commissioner, especially since he is president-elect of the national organization of ag commissioners?

We may differ on positions we take on issues, but how can any semblance of honest debate happen when someone like Aasmunstead is dishonest about those issues.

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