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Forum editorial: Cold spring soon will be a memory

Weather reporters keep calling the less-than-warm spring weather "unseasonable." Well, maybe. But the record indicates North Dakota and northwestern Minnesota are not strangers to snow and sub-freezing temperatures in early spring. It mig...

Weather reporters keep calling the less-than-warm spring weather "unseasonable."

Well, maybe.

But the record indicates North Dakota and northwestern Minnesota are not strangers to snow and sub-freezing temperatures in early spring. It might not seem "normal," but normal in this part of the world is not the same as in other places. "Spring" in this part of the world tends to be more a time when Ol' Man Winter refuses to relax his grip, rather than a season when warm breezes are harbingers of summer.

This year, the Northern Plains is not the only region grousing about spring snow. Storms have dumped snow in April and May from Minnesota to New England. It's been a cold, icy spring across most northern states, so North Dakota and Minnesota have shared weather headlines with Michigan, Vermont and New York State.

That's little consolation to farmers trying to get into the fields or homeowners watching daffodil blossoms collapse from the weight of wet snow. Lawnmowers are ready to go, but lawns are not ready to grow.

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And next? Well, if the pattern is repeated, summer will be upon us with a vengeance, and spring -- despite its cold and snow -- will be forgotten in the onslaught of pavement-baking sunshine, dry winds and (oh no!) that first hatch of bloodthirsty mosquitoes.

Enjoy. After all, winter is only about six months away ...

Forum editorials represent the opinion of Forum management and the newspaper's Editorial Board

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