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Forum editorial: Fargo's city attorney gets roses

PRAIRIE ROSES: To longtime Fargo City Attorney Garylle Stewart, who's been keeping the city out of legal trouble for nearly 36 years and shows no signs of wearing down. Fargo Mayor Bruce Furness called Stewart's knowledge of the law and of city h...

PRAIRIE ROSES: To longtime Fargo City Attorney Garylle Stewart, who's been keeping the city out of legal trouble for nearly 36 years and shows no signs of wearing down. Fargo Mayor Bruce Furness called Stewart's knowledge of the law and of city history remarkable. Officials say Stewart knows city ordinances backwards and forwards because he wrote most of them himself. While most folks Stewart's age, 63, are at least starting to think about retirement, the workaholic city attorney has no such plans. He likes what he's doing and plans to stick around until he keels over. In the meantime, the city of Fargo will continue to be the beneficiary of his vast experience and legal knowledge. We have to admit we knew Stewart fulfilled a very important role, but we didn't know he knew all that and did all those things. We're impressed and our hats are off to you, Mr. Stewart, for all that you do for the citizens of this great city. Thank you.

PRAIRIE ROSES: To 17-year-old Fargo North High School senior Molly Hensrud, one of just eight vocalists chosen for the 2004 Gibson/Baldwin Grammy Jazz Choir. The choir is part of this year's Grammy High School Jazz Ensembles, which includes 26 students from 12 states and one Canadian province. Hensrud is headed for Los Angeles for an intensive week of rehearsals and performances at jazz venues. It will all culminate with performances before and after the February Grammy Awards ceremony. She will also attend the ceremony. You've made all of us in Fargo-Moorhead proud, Molly. Knock their socks off in Los Angeles.

LEAFY SPURGE: To Katrina Combs of Urbana, Ohio, who accepted $6,400 in donations after she shaved her head and dyed her skin so people would think she had cancer. She was turned in by a co-worker. A community-wide chili supper was held for her in 2001 and people were holding weekly bake sales and giving her the proceeds. Combs says she used the money to pay bills over a three-year period. A judge recently sentenced Combs to three days in jail and three years of probation. As far as we're concerned, it takes a pretty sick puppy to pull a stunt like that.

PRAIRIE ROSES: To Fargo South junior Emily Campbell, who is sitting out the girls hockey season this year while she undergoes chemotherapy treatments for bone cancer. She was diagnosed with the disease last May, just two months after the Bruins won the first North Dakota High School Association sanctioned girls hockey state championship. Emily was a big part of the reason why the Bruins won the title. As a sophomore, she was one of the team's best defensive players. She attends games and practices when her strength allows and her teammates voted the 17-year-old one of the team's captains. Campbell is determined to return to the ice for her senior year next season. We'll all be pulling for you, Emily.

LEAFY SPURGE: To country music songwriter Hugh Prestwood, who was arrested recently after a loaded gun was found in his carry-on luggage at Long Island MacArthur Airport. The 61-year- old songwriter was on his way to Nashville when a screener noticed a .38-caliber revolver in his luggage. He was also arrested on two drug possession counts for carrying drugs for which he did not have prescriptions. Whatever Prestwood was taking must have addled his brain. That's the only explanation we can think of for making such a stupid move.

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Forum editorials represent the opinion of Forum management and the newspaper's Editorial Board

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