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Grampa Jack and Gramma Dee Hoerr, Moorhead, letter: Thanks for kindness after serious mishap

On Tuesday, Nov. 21, our 12-year-old granddaughter, Sebae Capson-Hoerr, was hit by a car on her way to school. There are several good things that happened as a result of this accident.

On Tuesday, Nov. 21, our 12-year-old granddaughter, Sebae Capson-Hoerr, was hit by a car on her way to school. There are several good things that happened as a result of this accident.

The man who hit her is a wonderful, caring person. The trauma has probably been harder on him than on Sebae.

That same night, Lonnie Dockter and his wife came to visit Sebae bearing gifts and a card. The interaction between Lonnie and Sebae was truly beautiful. She was very concerned all day because she thought the police had given him two tickets. She kept saying he shouldn't have gotten any tickets because it was her fault. (The "tickets" were traffic and insurance reports.)

He, of course, could see the bigger picture and what could have been a horrible tragedy no matter who was at fault.

Her grandpa and I want to thank all the kind people who stopped to help and the paramedics and police, too. We also want to thank the principal and assistant principal from Horizon Middle School for their concern, as well as all the teachers and students.

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We would like to raise the issue of left-turn signals at that busy corner and also a 20 mph school zone speed limit. This is a busy part of town with a lot of commuter traffic and heavy equipment. This accident should be a warning to all of us and to the city of Moorhead.

By the way, the Dockters brought Sebae a stuffed dog almost as big as she is. Guess what she named him? Lonnie Dockter, what else.

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