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Higher Education Notebook column: Happy award recognizes NDSU's Alby

Donna Alby's pearly whites and pleasant demeanor have earned her North Dakota State University's 2003 Mary McCannel Gunkelman Recognition Award. The award recognizes the person who makes the most significant and unselfish contribution to create a...

Donna Alby's pearly whites and pleasant demeanor have earned her North Dakota State University's 2003 Mary McCannel Gunkelman Recognition Award.

The award recognizes the person who makes the most significant and unselfish contribution to create a happy environment for the enjoyment of NDSU students.

Alby, an administrative secretary for mechanical engineering at NDSU, was supported in 56 nomination letters. They described her as a friendly, hardworking member of the department with a "$100 million smile."

MSUM faculty retire

Three faculty members at Minnesota State University Moorhead are retiring at the end of this school year.

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Psychology professor Phil Rice, who has taught at MSUM since 1974, plans to retire in Wet Mountain Valley, Colo., with his wife, Ruth.

Dean Hustuft, who arrived at MSUM in 1984 as a faculty member and was named director of instructional media five years later, plans to retire in Moorhead and travel with his wife, Carol.

John Sterner compiled a 157-101-2 record during 15 years as MSUM's head wrestling coach. He and his wife, JoAnn, eventually plan to retire in Rapid City, S.D.

Goldwater funds flow

Two NDSU students have been chosen to receive the prestigious Barry M. Goldwater Scholarship.

Joan Beckman, a senior from Jamestown, N.D., majoring in zoology and biotechnology, and Amy Richter, a senior chemistry major from Rugby, N.D., are among 300 students to get the awards in 2003.

The scholarship, which honors former Sen. Barry Goldwater, will cover the students' tuition, fees, books and housing up to $7,500 for each of the next two years.

Fly in the ointment

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An article about the evolution of flies, co-written by NDSU geology professor Allan Ashworth, appears in today's edition of Nature magazine.

The article, "A fly in the biogeographic ointment," is based on a fossil of a fly pupa found about 500 kilometers from the south pole during Ashworth's trip to Antarctica five years ago. The fossil came from rocks that are 3 million to 17 million years old.

Ashworth said the finding goes against previous findings by scientists in the Southern Hemisphere that flies are all derived from northern ancestors. The fly may have migrated into the area or evolved there, which "would turn the evolutionary history of flies on its head," he said.

Campaign tops goal

Staff, faculty and administrators at MSUM contributed $122,641 to this year's Campus Campaign as of April 30, well above the campaign goal of $115,000. The donations and pledges pay for student scholarships, university grants and programs.

A social to celebrate the campaign will be from 2 to 4 p.m. today outside Livingston Lord Library.

Hendrix open house

The new Hendrix Health Center on the south side of the MSUM campus will be dedicated at 3 p.m. today during a ribbon-cutting ceremony and open house.

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Readers can reach Forum reporter Mike Nowatzki at (701) 241-5528

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