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Higher lottery sales nothing to celebrate

Dilworth Minnesota lottery sales are up 9.2 percent. How wonderful - or is it? Clint Harris, Minnesota director of lottery sales, claims "Our players, especially in a down economy, want to have some fun." Another possibility, however, is that in ...

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Dilworth

Minnesota lottery sales are up 9.2 percent. How wonderful - or is it?

Clint Harris, Minnesota director of lottery sales, claims "Our players, especially in a down economy, want to have some fun."

Another possibility, however, is that in a down economy more of our most needy people are willing to bet what's left of the family's budget. They fall for the false hope that the flashy ads just may be true and believe they actually could win.

Harris made the further claim that players may be cutting back on expensive lattes to buy the tickets. But what if it's not the expensive lattes they are giving up but rather the money they used to spend on milk for the family? Could it be that some of that money would have been spent on fruits and veggies for the kids had it not been funneled into their gambling habit?

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Minnesotans have been bilked out of close to one-half billion dollars in the past year alone, according to statistics provided by Harris. With the new $20 scratch game launched in February, the state lottery is fleecing its people at a record pace.

There is something morally corrupt about a government that raises money on the backs of its most vulnerable people, giving them the false hope that they will be the one to break all odds, giving them the false hope that it will be them who leave the ranks of the millions of people who will get nothing in return for their money and join the relative handful that will actually come out on top.

Lottery sales are up by 9.2 percent. This is not cause for celebration but rather cause for shame.

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