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Hugh Weisenberger letter: Student from Tuttle is among our best

In a Jan. 13 letter from Norman Alme, "Ex-North Dakotan is really riff raff," he blasts young Mike Johnson, native of Tuttle, N.D., for his views on our 113-year-old anti co-habitation law. He also leaves the appearance that he is in alliance wit...

In a Jan. 13 letter from Norman Alme, "Ex-North Dakotan is really riff raff," he blasts young Mike Johnson, native of Tuttle, N.D., for his views on our 113-year-old anti co-habitation law. He also leaves the appearance that he is in alliance with former Gov. George Sinner on the issue.

Alme thinks young Johnson is the riff raff that Sinner speaks about. I say "not" to Alme. Young Johnson is a scholarship and honor student attending Stanford University. Attending Stanford is no small accomplishment in and of itself, and hardly in the classification of riff raff.

A while back, Johnson invited several of his fellow students to North Dakota to visit. The Forum did a story and published a picture of this group under the Fargo Theatre lights. Maybe their visit gave them an understanding on why the North Dakota Legislature does what it does. Thus the jokes and ribbing.

Sunday opening did not corrupt North Dakota society. Neither did bingo, blackjack, pull tabs, the horse track, etc. How will co-habitation do so?

Maybe Alme is not aware of the out-migration of North Dakota's bright and talented young people. And if he wishes to bash away at the opinions of these young people and wants them to stop claiming to be North Dakotans, why wouldn't they leave? Even more so, why would they return?

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In my view, young Mike Johnson's opinions are right on the mark. And if Johnson is riff raff to Alme, this state is indeed antiquated.

Hugh Weisenberger

Fargo

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