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James Anderson, West Fargo, letter: Farmers have only themselves to blame

Just when I thought I heard it all from farmers: Now they're blaming the sportsman for rising land values and claim hunters think that the farmers owe them something. Funny - I always felt it was the other way around.

Just when I thought I heard it all from farmers: Now they're blaming the sportsman for rising land values and claim hunters think that the farmers owe them something. Funny - I always felt it was the other way around.

All of this and more according to Gary Stang of Regent, N.D. (Forum, Dec. 3). Well perhaps he might consider this: The reason that hunters are buying land and thus competing with farmers for land is simple. He and others like him post their land and don't allow hunting. Thus the sportsmen really have no choice but to secure land in order to pursue their interest, thereby increasing the demand for land and effecting an increase in prices.

So really, Stang and others like him have no one to blame but themselves. The best way to counter this trend is not to post your land and allow hunters access as then there would be no need to purchase land for recreational use. As a bonus, rural communities would see a revenue boom the likes of which you wouldn't believe.

As for paying to hunt - every good hunter knows that paying to hunt is like feeding the bears. The more you feed them the more you get. That's why we don't pay to hunt. In order to preserve hunting from becoming another rich man's sport, all hunters must stop paying to hunt! If all hunters would do this, there wouldn't be an outfitting problem or land access issue to worry about.

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