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Jeff Hauser, Grand Forks, N.D., letter: U.S. military reneges on deal for recruits

The U.S. military is demanding that thousands of wounded service personnel give back signing bonuses because they are unable to serve out their commitments.

The U.S. military is demanding that thousands of wounded service personnel give back signing bonuses because they are unable to serve out their commitments.

To get people to sign up, the military gives enlistment bonuses up to $30,000 in some cases.

Now men and women who have lost arms, legs, eyesight, hearing and can no longer serve are being ordered to pay back some of that money.

So, if you enlist and collect your 30 grand, then get maimed serving your country and cannot fulfill your "contract," you are ordered to pay back some of that money. So this is what the people running this country call "supporting the troops"? Better to take the money from our troops than take back some tax cuts from the very wealthy? This is in your face, folks. I don't care what party you're in, this is not right.

I wonder if the recruiters tell their prospective future soldiers this information. I think we all know the answer to that.

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Jeff Hauser, Grand Forks, N.D., letter: U.S. military reneges on deal for recruits 20071125

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