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Jim and Lorraine Larson, Fargo, Letter: Fight to stop Fargo's flood control project

In regards to the $100 million flood control project the city leaders of Fargo are trying to shove upon the residents of Fargo who live south of Interstate 94:...

In regards to the $100 million flood control project the city leaders of Fargo are trying to shove upon the residents of Fargo who live south of Interstate 94:

When this project first hit the media, they said it could cost $3,000 in specials on a $150,000 home. Now, the mayor is going to Bismarck to ask the state of North Dakota for an additional $30 million. If Fargo gets the $30 million, the mayor quotes the specials would be $4,000 on a $150,000 home.

If this goes through, which we hope it doesn't, will a person with a $100,000 home pay the same amount of specials as a person with a $300,000 home?

Back in the winter-spring of 1996-97, which was supposed to be the flood of the century, the majority of the residents who are going to be hit hard with the assessment never saw any water. The majority of the residents south of I-94 will see absolutely no benefits from this assessment.

The way the economy is now, residents are struggling to make ends meet. Along with Fargo's high real estate tax, now the city leaders want to impose more financial hardship upon the residents of south Fargo.

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We hope the residents of south Fargo will stand up to the city leaders and fight against the high and unnecessary assessment.

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