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Jim Hanson letter: Let's not be proud of living off others

As I reflect on my life and when and where I was born I have to be so thankful that it was in the time of Sen. Byron Dorgan, D-N.D. Without him there wouldn't be any farms in North Dakota - (although there was a lot more before his immaculate con...

As I reflect on my life and when and where I was born I have to be so thankful that it was in the time of Sen. Byron Dorgan, D-N.D. Without him there wouldn't be any farms in North Dakota - (although there was a lot more before his immaculate conception) - no Social Security (although he has happily spent the money on other things) or any jobs in North Dakota (although Melroe and Steiger were around before him).

This is the slickest politician this state and maybe this nation has ever seen. He was Clinton before Clinton.

To brag about the fact that our state gets more money back per dollar sent in reminds me how low we have sunk as a state and a nation. I can never remember any of my ancestors or their friends bragging about getting other people's hard-earned money and acting like that is a character quality to be proud of.

The seeds of socialism that began to be sowed in our schools in the '60s are now rearing its ugly head. Hard work and honesty are replaced by slickness and what can I get for nothing. It is a cycle that unfortunately will be very hard to correct.

I am one North Dakota resident that feels shame when people identify us as the state that gets the most federal dollars per capita. Oh well, Dorgan can't do it alone; my fellow citizens must believe it to be a good thing also. God help us when we are completely socialist.

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Jim Hanson

Fargo

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