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Katherine Altendorf letter: Thefts at cemetery compound sorrow

In August of 1997 I buried my son. No words can express the anguish and emptiness one experiences when this happens. The ache a mother feels in her heart and arms is endless. I was preparing a room for our child at home and instead a room in heav...

In August of 1997 I buried my son. No words can express the anguish and emptiness one experiences when this happens. The ache a mother feels in her heart and arms is endless. I was preparing a room for our child at home and instead a room in heaven was prepared. The only means I have left to take care of my son is to bring him gifts of love. This brings me peace and solitude.

Unfortunately, someone who visits Holy Cross cemetery has violated that peace and that solitude. Since my son was buried a statue, toys and now a pot of flowers has been stolen from his grave. The final straw has been the pot of flowers. Who in their right mind would do such a thing?

Is nothing sacred anymore? I am outraged and hurt by this disregard to others grief ... my grief. They have no right to do this to anyone. And for what ... a pot of flowers? Those flowers were more than just flowers to me, they represented everything I lost, they represented a love a mother has for her child.

I want those who took these things from my son's grave to feel ashamed and guilty. I realize they may never have these emotions, for if they did, they never would have taken what didn't belong to them in the first place.

This is the only way I know how to get my message across ... leave what doesn't belong to you alone, leave compassion, and respect others.

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Katherine Altendorf

Moorhead

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