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L.A. (Tony) Braunagel letter: Environmental limits are needed

Protecting the environment has to have limits or some planning. I ask - when is enough? When do we have enough deer, geese, ducks, wetlands, wildlife easements, zoning, ordinances, blue dots, conservation trusts and wildlife protection areas?...

We are part of The Trust Project.

Protecting the environment has to have limits or some planning. I ask - when is enough? When do we have enough deer, geese, ducks, wetlands, wildlife easements, zoning, ordinances, blue dots, conservation trusts and wildlife protection areas?

As concerned citizens, we owe it to the next generation to ask just how many acres the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is planning to control. We need to know what they now have in total easements in real acres - not just water area. Water acre numbers change during dry and wet years, but easement acres are fixed in area and duration. We should be able to know the accurate number of acres within their control.

There should be planning as to what the safe growth carrying capacity is. For example, as the human population goes up, something has to change. Should the wildlife population go down, or should it be the human population?

Limits have to be set to relieve pressure on the ecosystem. Don't forget - agriculture is a part of this system. It's not just wildlife and tree huggers.

We should be asking who the anonymous donors to so-called "do-gooder" organizations are. These donors appear to want to control the process by their donations.

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All nonprofit organizations should lose their nonprofit status if planning and fiscal transparency is not available to all. Enough is enough. Let's have honesty.

If you're concerned about private property rights, including easements and hunting issues, I invite you to check out the Landowners Association of North Dakota (LAND) Web site at: www.ndland.org .

L.A. (Tony) Braunagel

Devils Lake, N.D.

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