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Letter: Congress shouldn't slap together a health care plan

I have been an electrical worker for 15 years. I have built the new Sanford in Fargo, Concordia College remodel jobs, and I have worked in western North Dakota in the oil fields over the years. I'm proud to be a highly-skilled professional who go...

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I have been an electrical worker for 15 years. I have built the new Sanford in Fargo, Concordia College remodel jobs, and I have worked in western North Dakota in the oil fields over the years. I'm proud to be a highly-skilled professional who goes to work every day building quality projects my community can count on.

My years of experience helping build some of the most state-of-the-art and complex structures in the Red River Valley have taught me a few things that I think Congress could really use right now: Complex projects take a lot of planning, teamwork and coordination to be constructed.

You need input and expertise from a lot of different people and trades. Most importantly, building something you can be proud of takes hard work. If you just slap something together haphazardly, it's going to be poor quality and likely dangerous to your community.

Congress needs to take the time and properly build a health care system that we can be proud of as Americans. Working families deserve quality healthcare they can afford and count on to be there when they need it.

I go to work everyday and do my job the right way, so should Congress.

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Schilling lives in Barnesville, Minn.

Related Topics: HEALTH
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