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Letter: Please help me find this 'Fargo Good Samaritan'

I am a female senior citizen and live in St. Louis. In June of this year my husband and I were on vacation and were visiting Theodore Roosevelt National Park. At one of the scenic overlooks I started to climb the path and was carrying my two came...

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I am a female senior citizen and live in St. Louis. In June of this year my husband and I were on vacation and were visiting Theodore Roosevelt National Park. At one of the scenic overlooks I started to climb the path and was carrying my two cameras when I slipped and fell. There was a man walking behind me with his two young sons and he quickly stepped up to where I was and grabbed my arm and helped me up and then he said he would help me walk to the top.

My husband was on the other side with my left arm and the "Fargo Good Samaritan" was on my right. I thanked him and said it was so nice of him to do that and he simply said, "That's what anyone should do, we all need to help each other."

Once we got to the top the man and his two young sons went on to a higher point and I took in the view and then retreated back down to the parking lot.

Before we left I turned my camera towards the peak of the monolith and there he was with his two sons-the wonderful, kind hearted Fargo Good Samaritan.

I only wish I had gotten his name and maybe his address or email address so I could send him the picture I took as a thank you for his kindness.

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I was hoping a reader might be able to help me find this Fargo Good Samaritan.

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