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Letter: Taxpayers shouldn't have to support people who don't work

As the battle over Obamacare's repeal heats up, we're hearing more and more sob stories about the '18-21 million' who will 'lose their insurance.'Look, I'm a native of crime-ridden, run-down Norfolk, Virginia. The whole region is overrun with laz...

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As the battle over Obamacare's repeal heats up, we're hearing more and more sob stories about the '18-21 million' who will 'lose their insurance.'

Look, I'm a native of crime-ridden, run-down Norfolk, Virginia. The whole region is overrun with lazy bums who won't work because... well, they just don't feel like it, and these are the people that the ACA was written for.

The brutal truth is the ACA was simply a scheme to woo votes from the incurably lazy. Did it insure a few deserving people? Yes. Will its repeal take coverage from a few deserving people? Yes. But it must be repealed.

Look, there's always collateral damage when you set out to write public policy. But the bigger picture is you can't destroy the middle class to support the laziest cross-section of our society.

(I work my rear end off for health insurance, and my premiums went up threefold to cover potential Democratic voters. I didn't deserve that.)

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The simple truth is someone who won't work deserves absolutely nothing. No housing, no food, no 'social services'... and no medical care. We have enough problems dealing with the elderly and deserving needy; we shouldn't be worrying about shiftless no-accounts.

Moser lives in Fargo.

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