I am not a trauma surgeon. I am not an emergency medicine doctor. I’m an infertility doctor with no special expertise in treating gunshot wounds. I should also mention that I have guns in my home. They get used about once a year for hunting, and then they’re stored, unloaded, in a locked case, with the ammo locked up separately. I am not here to take away guns.

But come on, people. It is unconscionable that the United States has had more than one mass shooting per day this year. The other developed nations have had zero. Blaming video games and prayer in schools and mental illness don’t bring back those lives that are lost, and it doesn’t prevent the loss of more lives in today’s mass shooting, wherever that will be. Our kids are practicing active shooter drills and then having recurrent nightmares about school shootings. We are traumatizing our children and doing absolutely nothing to protect them. Common sense laws like background checks, red flag laws, and a ban on assault weapons don’t limit anyone’s freedom, rights or hunting season.

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Your Second Amendment right does not give you the right to endanger me.

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Your possession of weapons of war does not protect me. The El Paso Walmart shooting occurred in a place with many heavily armed people, “good guys with guns” who did nothing to stop the carnage. Nothing.

Your gun collection is not more important than my child.

Your hobby is not more important than my brother.

Your hunting season is not more important than my neighbor.

We all need to ask Sens. John Hoeven, Kevin Cramer, Tina Smith and Amy Klobuchar to return to Washington and give us a vote on the gun safety bills passed by Congress this year.

I am also calling on my colleagues in the medical profession to speak out as well, whether to their patients, on social media, or in letters like this to The Forum. Ask your patients about gun safety, ask about guns in the home. Ask about guns just like you ask about sunscreen, seat belts and helmets. Use your voice and the respect you have earned in your community to educate and speak out about this entirely preventable cause of death in America.