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Letter: Let's set the record straight on what constitutes a blizzard

Austinson writes, "What we have more nowadays is snow and blowing snow and then winds continuing causing whiteout conditions."

Letter to the editor FSA

Noticing the headlines again in Monday's Forum. We need to remind the press and the National Weather Service of the true definition of a blizzard.

A blizzard is defined as a snowstorm that has heavy snow combined with sustained winds of 50 mph or greater.

Pretty self explanatory. What we have more nowadays is snow and blowing snow and then winds continuing causing whiteout conditions. I just wanted to point out and set the record strait.

James Austinson lives in Ada, Minn.

This letter does not necessarily reflect the opinion of The Forum's editorial board nor Forum ownership.

Related Topics: WEATHER
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