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Letter: Praise for the Badass Grandmas

"The Grandmas point out that new Ethics Commission rules don't properly address conflicts of interest with campaign donations in North Dakota," writes Mott, N.D. resident Kevin Carvell. "It makes sense to scrutinize these rules to ensure politicians aren't being paid off."

Letter to the editor FSA

Doesn't Rob Port have anything better to do than pick on Ellen Chaffee and Dina Butcher ? The Badass Grandmas have done good work trying to keep the Ethics Commission on track.

The Grandmas point out that new Ethics Commission rules don't properly address conflicts of interest with campaign donations in North Dakota. It makes sense to scrutinize these rules to ensure politicians aren't being paid off.

Isn't it clear that taking political donations from industries the state's Industrial Commission and Public Service Commission regulate is unethical? Is it okay to pay off politicians?

It's no secret Port has been a cheerleader for the fossil fuels industry. Blog posts going back 15 year praise Big Oil and Big Coal and he once worked for a marketing firm funded by the Koch Brothers. That organization pays to bring in their out-of-state views to influence public opinion here.

The Grandmas, meanwhile, should be praised.

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Kevin Carvell is a resident of Mott, N.D.

This letter does not necessarily reflect the opinion of The Forum's editorial board nor Forum ownership.

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