ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Letter: The broken child care industry needs fixing

"The child care industry has been subsidizing early care and education on the backs of teachers through low wages and by burdening parents with tuition rates that just keep climbing," writes Kay Heidrich, director of Trinity Lutheran Church Preschool. "This needs to stop. Our system is broken and needs to be fixed."

Letter to the editor FSA
We are part of The Trust Project.

Early childhood is a time of great growth and development that sets the stage for future success in school and life. Recent letters from Nicole Flick and Jill Magnell made it clear how crucial the first five years of life is to brain development and growth. I am adding my voice to theirs and many others to say that we must invest in child care and we must do it soon!

The child care industry has been subsidizing early care and education on the backs of teachers through low wages and by burdening parents with tuition rates that just keep climbing. This needs to stop. Our system is broken and needs to be fixed. We are losing staff and programs at an alarming rate. We want to be open with full classrooms, but without staff we cannot open our rooms and are struggling to provide the services that families so desperately need.

We need to fully fund child care. Our newly-elected officials need to hear how much you care about child care. We are asking for support to increase child care assistance to include more families at low- to moderate-income levels. We are asking for universal child care. We are asking that staff be paid on par with K-12 teachers. We are underpaid and deserve a living wage. Our government and businesses must do more to keep early care and education alive and available. Stand up for children. We are counting on you and taking note of our champions in the legislature. Be a light!

Kay Heidrich is the director of Trinity Lutheran Church Preschool in Moorhead.

This letter does not necessarily reflect the opinion of The Forum's editorial board nor Forum ownership.

ADVERTISEMENT

READ MORE OF THE LATEST LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
Fargo resident Hardy Koenig writes that columnist Tony Bender has a way of making him laugh and cry.
Marking his last year of Catholic Schools Week, Giovanni Nasello, a senior and the student body president at Shanley High school, shares his appreciation for his teachers, classmates and the JPII Catholic Schools community.
Deborah Seaberg writes, "Religion is personal and should stay that way. In your home and in your church. Not in the government that affects all people and not just Christians.'
ND House Majority Leader Mike Lefor writes, "The legislation will update the law to create opportunities that directly support our farmers, not compete with them."
Ken Koehler writes, "Pre-born human life in Minnesota may now be legally treated as nothing more than property to be disposed of."
Chuck Coate of Fargo writes, "trans people (should) compete against other trans people, just like the Special Olympics."
Reid Messerschmidt of Fargo calls on Gov. Burgum to veto all bills aimed at punishing transgender individuals in North Dakota.
Melissa Sobolik writes, "At the Great Plains Food Bank, we believe when you feed a child, you feed the future. By making school meals free for all students, it levels the playing field."
David Withee recently moved here from Green Bay, Wisconsin. He writes about learning tax laws in a new city and state.

What To Read Next
Commissioner Preston writes, "We need a long-range financial plan for funding infrastructure in this city. Until then, it is the responsibility of the City Commission to prioritize the funding we have."
Gerald B. Jacobs writes, "Considering the wide-spread violence in the U.S. compared to other countries, it seems that longer sentencing might not be getting at the problem."
Ken Sims writes, "Progressives use 'separation of church and state' to argue against a national religion. But what they are really separating is God (not church) from government and promoting secularism."
Kevin J. Glatt of Bismarck writes, "Perhaps we have a property tax exemption problem in North Dakota."