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Letter: The dangers of blindly following the majority

"Many disasters have been created by the majority, just as many disasters have been averted by the minority," writes Mike Quinn of Bismarck. "We elect people because we believe they are better than us, smarter than us and more moral."

Letter to the editor FSA
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The notion that what the majority wants is right, moral or good has some serious drawbacks.

The majority wanted slavery at one time. That did not make it right, good or God’s will. For many years the majority thought smoking was harmless. Hitler was elected by a majority. Science does not pay attention to the majority. The planet is in dire straits no matter how many deny it.

Elected officials that feel they should do what the majority who elected them wants are a real threat. Republicans who went along with the majority who elected them in North Dakota were accessories to the insurrection former Pres. Donald Trump plotted.

Elected officials have a moral obligation to do the right thing, not what the majority wants. Rep. Liz Cheney is a shining example of a moral person who is doing what is right rather than what is popular. Any coward like the ones who represent North Dakota now can do the easy immoral thing and support a majority of Fox News watchers.

Many disasters have been created by the majority, just as many disasters have been averted by the minority. We elect people because we believe they are better than us, smarter than us and more moral. No one wants an elected official who is as ignorant as the majority. Elect someone smarter than the average, more decent than the average and we will all be better off.

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Mike Quinn is a resident of Bismarck.

This letter does not necessarily reflect the opinion of The Forum's editorial board nor Forum ownership.

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