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McFeely: You can't fix stupid, so why try?

Somebody needs to give a heads-up when it's OK to be honest again, when the snowflakes who voted for Donald Trump can handle the truth.

Mike McFeely, Oct. 17, 2015Michael Vosburg / Forum Photo Editor
Mike McFeely, Oct. 17, 2015Michael Vosburg / Forum Photo Editor

Somebody needs to give a heads-up when it's OK to be honest again, when the snowflakes who voted for Donald Trump can handle the truth.

Because after Trump was elected president, you see, some of us pointed out that clearly-crystal clearly-a fair number of people who cast their ballot for Don the Con were perhaps lacking in the brights department. They weren't the sharpest tools in the shed. Not the brightest bulbs in the box. Not all, not a majority, not even a large minority. But a meaningful number were willfully ignorant of facts and relished in their glorious cluelessness.

When some of us tried to point that out, that those who believed Trump was going to bring back the steel industry and build a wall and drain the swamp were being played for suckers, we were told to stop. We can't do that because it's insulting to those people. It belittles them. It makes them more resentful than they already are.

Instead, we were told, we need to understand those Trump voters. We need to respect them. Listen to them. Walk a mile in their shoes to grasp how difficult it is for them to deal with this rapidly changing world.

And so we tried. We tried to be sympathetic about the struggles of those "real Americans" who felt left behind, economically and socially, in 2017. We listened to all the so-called disadvantages some white, working-class people have in the modern world. We heard how Washington, D.C., ignored them and how the media and educated "elites" looked down their noses at them.

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Frankly, we didn't quite understand how their plight was any different from any other group of Americans battling to get good jobs and attain a comfortable middle-class life-blacks and other minorities, for example-but we listened. We read. We tried to understand. We bit our tongue.

And then last week happened.

National Public Radio, in its infinite excellence, used the occasion of July 4th to recite the Declaration of Independence on Twitter. In 140-character snippets, NPR tweeted out the Declaration to its more than 7 million followers.

What followed was either comical or depressing or both. Some Trump supporters, to use the words of the Huffington Post, "flipped out." Unable to grasp the tweets were the Declaration of Independence being used to celebrate America's 241st birthday, they accused NPR of pushing anti-Trump propaganda and "calling for a revolution."

"Glad you are being defunded. You have have never been balanced on your show," wrote one Trump supporter.

So we ask: Has the statute of limitations expired? Is it OK to again call a spade a spade? Or, in this case, an idiot an idiot?

These people are not worthy of being listened to. They don't deserve respect. It seems fairly obvious that, if indeed they are struggling for a good job or a decent paycheck, there's a reason why.

They are stupid. No amount of empathy or understanding is going to change that.

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There's an old saw that says, "You can't fix stupid." We'll add this: So why try? The least we can do is start being honest again. Let us know when it's OK to do that.

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