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Michael F. Beaton letter: NDSU Downtown is a very good thing

Nearly all local media reported the huge threat to downtown Fargo caused by the opening of North Dakota State University Downtown. Reporters speculated that the influx of students and faculty would have a dire effect on downtown renaissance. Majo...

Nearly all local media reported the huge threat to downtown Fargo caused by the opening of North Dakota State University Downtown. Reporters speculated that the influx of students and faculty would have a dire effect on downtown renaissance. Major traffic jams, over crowded sidewalks and privately owned parking lots filled with student vehicles were sure to be the case.

Many downtown property owners were bracing themselves against the gigantic problem caused by students and faculty parking their vehicles in every available street space and in private parking lots. Buses transporting students and private vehicles would cause traffic to be backed up at intersections on N P Avenue every day. Several potential problems were pointed out by print and electronic media in advance of the opening of the building.

To date, none of this has come to fruition. A call to the Downtown Community Partnership office today found no complaints about the speculated problems were registered. "No problem," was the comment offered when I called a nearby neighbor of the building and inquired about student problems. I own a closeby property, with a parking lot for my tenants, and I have had the same experience so far - no problem.

I, as well as others, welcome NDSU to downtown. Many students have been observed using the bus system tailored for their special needs instead of personal vehicles, resulting in no big parking lot intrusions. In my opinion, four or five vehicles stacked at an intersection, rather than two or three, and a few more people using the sidewalks is a good thing.

Michael F. Beaton

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vice president

Schlossman Commercial Real Estate, Inc.

Fargo

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