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MS chapter observes week for volunteers

Fargo The north-central states chapter of the National Multiple Sclerosis Society is celebrating Volunteer Week through Friday.. It is one week out of the year that we have devoted to our hard-working volunteers who have selflessly given time to ...

Fargo

The north-central states chapter of the National Multiple Sclerosis Society is celebrating Volunteer Week through Friday.. It is one week out of the year that we have devoted to our hard-working volunteers who have selflessly given time to the following events: Walk MS, Bike MS and the Little Black Dress for MS luncheon.

We would like to acknowledge their devotion to the 2008 season. It is because of them that we are able to raise the funds needed for the 8,000 MS clients and their families within our chapter, which includes North Dakota, South Dakota and Iowa.

Multiple sclerosis interrupts the flow of information from the brain to the body and stops people from moving. Every hour in the United States, someone is newly diagnosed with MS, an unpredictable, often disabling disease of the central nervous system. Symptoms range from numbness and tingling to blindness and paralysis. The progress, severity and specific symptoms of MS in any one person cannot yet be predicted, but advances in research and treatment are moving us closer to a world free of MS. Most people with MS are diagnosed between the ages of 20 and 50, with more than twice as many women as men contracting the disease. MS affects more than 400,000 people in the United States, and 2.5 million worldwide.

Once again, thank you to our volunteers. You are truly helping us create a world free of MS.

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Hinkemeyer is development manager for the National MS Society.

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