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NDSU student seeks historic win

A 19-year-old North Dakota State University student is aiming to become the youngest state legislator in state history. Jacob Holm, a sophomore from rural Fingal, N.D., is running for a House of Representatives seat in District 20, his home district.

Jake Holm

A 19-year-old North Dakota State University student is aiming to become the youngest state legislator in state history.

Jacob Holm, a sophomore from rural Fingal, N.D., is running for a House of Representatives seat in District 20, his home district.

It's been Holm's dream since he was in junior high to become a politician. The Republican's goal is to become a U.S. senator for North Dakota.

Holm, a history education major, has been active with Students Against Destructive Decisions, including at the national level, for about five years.

He's given legislative testimony, worked with congressional leaders on prevention issues and has trained youth advocacy groups.

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Lee Erickson, North Dakota SADD coordinator, said if he didn't know Holm, he'd probably be skeptical of a 19-year-old running for office.

But after working closely with Holm for four years, Erickson thinks Holm would do an excellent job.

"Jake is probably the most mature 19-year-old I've ever met in my life," Erickson said.

There have been legislators elected at age 21, according to the Legislative Council Library.

If elected, Holm will take spring semester off from NDSU to focus on the session.

NDSU sophomore Amanda Dimmer, who has been friends with Holm since grade school, said Holm inspires other young people.

"He's a really motivating person," Dimmer said. "He makes you feel like anything's possible."

Holm is one of four candidates running for two House seats in District 20. The other candidates are incumbent Lee Kaldor, D-Mayville, Richard Holman, D-Mayville, and Larry O'Brien, R-Mayville.

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"If I'm not elected next week, I will be elected some day," Holm said.

MSUM Emmy

Fourteen Minnesota State University Moorhead students in a broadcast documentary class received an Upper Midwest Emmy award last weekend.

"The Greatest Silent Sport," a documentary that follows Bart Smith as he hikes the North Country National Scenic Trail, won in the college non-news/entertainment category.

To commemorate the 40th anniversary of the National Trails System, Smith is walking and photographing all seven of the national scenic trails. The trail featured in the program is 4,600 miles from North Dakota to New York.

Students wrote, reported, photographed and edited material for the project with professor Martin Grindeland as their adviser.

This is the second year in a row MSUM students have won an Emmy.

Civic radio

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A new radio show by an NDSU faculty member aims to give a voice to civic issues affecting the community.

Mark Meister, associate professor of communication, has launched "Civic Radio" on KNDS 96.3 FM. The show airs from 10 a.m. to noon Wednesdays.

The show's goal is to give the community a forum to discuss opinions and to inspire people to become active civic leaders. A student will eventually take over hosting the show.

KNDS is a partnership between NDSU and Radio Free Fargo, a community organization.

Readers can reach Forum reporter Amy Dalrymple at (701) 241-5590

or adalrymple@forumcomm.com

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