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Other views: U.S. comb honey shown to have healing properties

A follow-up of the Jan. 14 article on "healing" honey published in The Forum: In June 2008, I will have been a hobby beekeeper for 49 years with a maximum number of 48 hives. I am disappointed with the inference that you have to go to Canada or b...

A follow-up of the Jan. 14 article on "healing" honey published in The Forum:

In June 2008, I will have been a hobby beekeeper for 49 years with a maximum number of 48 hives.

I am disappointed with the inference that you have to go to Canada or buy special honey from Australia or New Zealand in order to experience the healing effects of honey.

Many people have volunteered their testimony to me that comb honey produced in the United States has healed bleeding stomach ulcers, burns, infected wounds, sore throats and ulcerated sores that would not heal with other medications.

God has blessed raw natural honey in the comb (comb honey) with healing enzymes that promote healing in people who use it properly. It has to be completely raw (not heated above 101 degrees F.). Sealed comb honey has the highest amount of healing enzymes. It has to be properly harvested and stored to maintain healing enzymes.

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Natural raw honey will granulate (sugar). In order to stop this naturally occurring change in the liquid honey into a solid form, the honey is heated to 165 degrees for five minutes (pasteurized). This kills the healing enzymes and destroys most of the natural healing effects in honey.

When honey is kept 100 percent pure, it does not have to be pasteurized. We have four children, and we fed raw honey to all of them beginning at a few months of age with no problems. If the honey is not 100 percent pure, it can cause problems for infants who eat it.

There are natural antibiotics in honey and healing enzymes. There are beekeepers in the United States who produce raw natural honey in the comb (comb honey).

Sillerud is from Ada, Minn.

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